Approaching the 11th Anniversary of the JOBS Act

Eleven years ago, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act was signed into law in a White House Rose Garden ceremony. Looking back on this landmark legislation, we see its impact has been far-reaching. From increased access to capital for small businesses to the rise of new markets for investment opportunities, the JOBS Act has reshaped how companies raise funds and spur economic growth. In 2022, $150.9 B was raised through Regulations A+, CF, and D, showcasing the tremendous power of these regulations for companies. As we mark the 11th anniversary of this game-changing law, let’s look at what it has accomplished and how it is (still) changing the capital formation landscape.

 

David Wield: The Father of the JOBS Act

 

David Weild IV is a veteran Wall Street executive and advisor to U.S. and international capital markets. He has become well known as a champion of small business as the “Father of the JOBS Act”. Signed into law by President Barack Obama in April 2012, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act has opened up access to capital markets, giving small businesses and startups the ability to raise money from a much larger pool of investors. Wield has remarked that this was not a political action; it was signed in “an incredibly bipartisan fashion, which is really a departure from what we’ve generally seen. It actually increases economic activity. It’s good for poor people, good for rich people. And it adds to the US Treasury”.

 

As such, Weild is seen as a leading figure in the JOBS Act movement, inspiring the startup community to break down barriers and build the future. He has helped make it easier for companies to become public, empowering a new generation of entrepreneurs looking to start or grow their businesses. Furthermore, Weild’s efforts have allowed more investors to participate in capital markets.

 

Benefitting from the JOBS Act

 

At the inception of the JOBS Act in 2012, non-accredited investors were only allowed to invest up to $2,000 or 5% of their net worth per year. This was designed to protect non-accredited investors from taking on too much risk by investing in startups, as these investments would likely be high risk and high reward. Since then, the JOBS Act has expanded to allow non-accredited investors to invest up to 10% of their net worth or $107,000 per year in startups and private placements.  

 

For companies they were initially allowed to raise:

 

  • Up to $50 million in RegA+ offerings
  • $1 million through crowdfunding (RegCF)
  • Unlimited capital from accredited investors under RegD

 

These numbers have grown significantly since 2012, with:

 

  • Reg A allowing $75 million to be raised
  • Reg CF allowing $5 million to be raised

 

These rules have opened the door for startups to access large amounts of capital that otherwise may not have been available to them. This has allowed more companies to grow, innovate and create jobs in the U.S.

 

How Much has Been Raised with JOBS Act Regulations?

 

The JOBS Act regulations have revolutionized how capital is raised by companies and how investors access new markets. According to Crowdfund Insider, companies have raised:

 

  • $1.8 Billion from July 2021 to June 2022 with RegA+
  • $2.3 trillion with RegD 506(B)
  • $148 trillion with RegD 506(C)
  • $506.7 million with RegCF

 

Since its formation in 2012, the JOBS Act has opened up a variety of avenues for entrepreneurs to access capital. The exempt offering ecosystem has allowed innovators to raise large sums of money with relatively fewer requirements than a traditional public offering, while still requiring compliance and offering investors protection. This has enabled companies to stay in business and grow, allowing the US economy to remain competitive on the global stage.

 

Insights from Industry Leaders

 

Expanding the discussion about capital formation, KoreConX launched its podcast series, KoreTalkX in April 2022. Through this platform, we’ve hosted many thought leaders and experts to share their insights on capital-raising strategies and compliance regulations. Guests have included renowned thought leaders including David Weild, Jason Fishman, Shari Noonan, Joel Steinmetz, Jonny Price, Douglas Ruark, Sara Hanks, and many others. Each of these episodes has explored topics in-depth to provide entrepreneurs with the tools they need to be successful when raising capital from investors.

Jumpstart Our Business Startups: Democratizing Access To Capital

The JOBS Act (Jumpstart Our Business Startups) reached its 10th anniversary in 2022 and we keep working on education to empower people through private capital markets. Even though it has already been a decade, we are still clearing the land to open up more opportunities. The Wharton Magazine anticipated that the JOBS Act would be as impactful in changing how we allocate capital as social media has been in how we manage time. Both entrepreneurs and regular people, such as customers, are able to be part of the financial market. Brand advocates, for example, can easily become shareholders, democratizing access to capital.

 

Meaningful changes

 

Title V in the JOBS Act raised the number of possible shareholders to 2,000, while 499 can be non-accredited. To give an exact feel of how deep this change is, before the JOBS Act, the maximum number of shareholders was 500, all of whom had to be accredited. This opens up opportunities for nearly everyone who wants to invest in the private capital market. And the bigger pool of potential investors also benefits the companies looking to raise capital. 

 

With regulations such as A (RegA+) and crowdfunding (RegCF), both accredited and non-accredited investors can be part of capital raising. Companies do not need to go public anymore to raise capital as entrepreneurs maintain control. Using RegA+, companies can now raise up to $75 million every 12 months. For RegCF, the limit is $5 million.

 

Market size

 

There are plenty of possibilities that arise from the regulations and how they change companies’ perspectives. The available pool of capital is expected to reach up to $30 trillion by 2030, making it a promising resource for companies. Also, there are several online services and platforms that have come up in recent years, such as KoreConX, but we will talk about those in other posts.

 

Equity Crowdfunding with RegCF

 

This form of capital raising for non-accredited investors is very new (2016) but it has shown steady growth since it was introduced. In its first full year (2017), $76.8 million were raised like this. In 2021, this number skyrocketed to $502 million. Startup customers, closest clients in a database, and closest network members can become valuable investors. Brand advocates can be more motivated to make a difference in a startup’s life once they can become shareholders.

 

RegA+

 

Although there are great possibilities for companies going for a RegA+, there are still some important investments involved. As a general rule, it is a good idea to be ready to spend at least $250,000 on a successful RegA+ offering. There are several steps that have to be accomplished, such as filing, which involve fees for lawyers and auditors, broker-dealer firms, investor acquisition costs like PR/advertising and social media, and online roadshows.

 

How Regulations Democratize Access to Capital

 

If you think about it, democracy is all about empowering as many people as possible to participate in and have a say in how society develops. The JOBS Act does that first and most directly by giving ordinary people more opportunity to own a stake in businesses, to become shareholders. But that wider pool of potential investors also empowers more entrepreneurs to get the funding to bring their ideas to fruition, which in turn creates jobs, empowering still more people to participate and, if they choose, to make their own investments. The entire ecosystem flourishes.

 

If you want to understand more about how the regulations help business grow and jumpstart our business startups, you can take a closer look at presentations from the father of the JOBS Act, David Weild IV, founders, funding portals and investors in our YouTube Channel.

It All Started with the JOBS Act

This month, we launched our newest series, KoreTalkX, during which we have hosted exciting, one-on-one conversations with industry experts to expand the knowledge base on capital raising in the private markets. We’re recapping the episodes so far and look forward to the next live event on Tuesday, May 31st, when Dr. Kiran Garimella (CTO, KoreConX) and Andrew Bull (Founding Memeber), Bull Blockchain Law) discuss digital securities. 

 

KoreTalkX #1: 10th Anniversary of the JOBS Act

In this conversation, David Weild IV, Father of the JOBS Act, and Oscar Jofre discuss the importance of the JOBS Act concerning small businesses and entrepreneurship. An important focus has been how the Act has helped increase innovation and expand access to capital for smaller companies, which is crucial for paving a brighter future.

 

Listen to the full episode on Spotify, Amazon, or iTunes!

 

KoreTalkX #2: How Can ESG Reshape Capital Raising?

This talk between Peter Daneyko and Paul Karrlsson-Willis, CEO of Justly Markets, discusses impact investing and ESG (environmental, social, and governance) criteria. Since the JOBS Act has allowed more people to invest in companies and given rise to the popularity of crowdfunding and investing for non-accredited investors, they discuss how many people are investing in businesses with missions they’re passionate about. 

 

Listen to the full episode on Spotify, Amazon, or iTunes!

 

KoreTalkX #3: How to Start and Manage a Cap Table?

In this discussion, Amanda Grange and Matthew McNamara, Managing Partner at Assurance Dimensions, talk about starting and managing a cap table. A primary focus is how the SEC compliance guidelines protect companies and how a good transfer agent will help a company stay within those guidelines. They also talk about how a well-managed and structured cap table can streamline a raise.

 

Listen to the full episode on Spotify, Amazon, or iTunes!

 

KoreTalkX #4: Thoughts on Investor Acquisition

Jason Futko and Tim Martinez, co-founder of Digital Niche Agency, talk about how to acquire investors for your startup. They highlight how important it is to have a good strategy before launching your campaign and how companies have a powerful opportunity to transform investors and customers into brand ambassadors. Additionally, they suggest entrepreneurs be prepared for a long marathon to achieve success and how to help achieve this in today’s climate.

 

Listen to the full episode on Spotify, Amazon, or iTunes!

 

The Evolution of Reg A+

During the recent Dare to Dream KoreSummit, David Weild IV, the Father of the JOBS Act, spoke about companies going from public to private, access to capital Reg A+, the future of small businesses raising capital, and the future of the broker-dealer system. The following blog summarizes his keynote address and what Wield believes will be the future of raising capital for small businesses. 

 

Reg A+’s Creation

The JOBS Act, passed in 2012, helped address a significant decrease in America’s IPOs. “When I was vice-chairman of NASDAQ, I was very concerned with some of the market structure changes that went on with our public markets that dropped the bottom out of support for small-cap equities,” said Weild. “80% of all initial public offerings in the United States were sub $50 million in size. And in a very short period of time, we went from 80%, small IPOs to 20%, almost overnight.” The number of operating public companies decreased from about nine thousand to five thousand. The changes in the market significantly restricted smaller companies from growing, unable to go public because of prohibitive costs and other expenses. 

 

Effect on Small Business

After years of lobbying and the passage of the JOBS Act, only one of the seven titles went into effect instantaneously: RegA+. With this new option for raising capital, startups could raise $50 million in money without filing a public offering. The previous maximum was $5 million; this would eventually be increased to $75 million. It also expanded the number of shareholders a company can have before registering publicly, which is essential as companies can raise money from accredited and non-accredited investors through this regulation. RegA+ and the other rules have had a significant impact on the way startups do business. This has been a significant benefit for small businesses, as it has allowed them to raise more money without going through the hassle and expense of becoming a public company. 

 

Reg A+ into the Future

The capital raising process was digitized by taking the investment process and making it direct through crowdfunding, removing economic incentives for small broker-dealers who could not make their desired commission on transactions. This resulted in many of them consolidating out of business and leaving a gap in the private capital market ecosystem that supports corporate finance. Changes to the JOBS Act are beginning to reintroduce incentives for broker-dealers, which will continue to shape the future of private investments as it will continue to facilitate the growth of a secondary market. Wield’s thoughts on the future of capital raising marketing are that the market is not yet corrected, but it is on track. He said: “I would tell you that there’s a great appetite in Washington to do things that are going to improve capital formation.”

 

Getting more players like broker-dealers involved in the RegA+ ecosystem will do nothing but benefit the space. In his closing remarks, Wield said that this would provide for a “greater likelihood that we’re going to fund more earlier stage businesses, which in turn gives us the opportunity to create jobs and upward mobility. Hopefully, since much entrepreneurial activity is focused on social impact companies to solve great challenges of our time, whether it’s in life sciences, and medicine, or climate change, you know, I firmly believe that the solutions for climate change are apt to come from scientists and engineers who’ve cracked the code on cutting emissions or taking CO2 out of the atmosphere. And so from where I said, getting more entrepreneurs funded is going to be important to have a better chance of leaving a respectable environment for the next generation.”

KoreSummit RegA+ 2020

KoreSummit is all about education,  We are pleased to be able to offer you the opportunity to receive first-hand knowledge from leading thought leaders to help you in your journey to capital raising.

The KoreSummit RegA+ 2020 online event was a huge success because of you who attended and shared it with your friends.  As promised here are the video segments.

Complete Live Stream

 

RegA+ Verticals

 

Legal RegA+ Global Companies

 

Investor Acquisition/Distribution

 

PR/IR/Social Media/Press

 

Research, Ratings

 

Role of FINRA Broker-Dealer

 

RegA+ Success, the CEO’s

 

The Main Event

 

Digital Securities for RegA+

 

Compliance for RegA+

 

Shareholder Management & Communications

SEC changes to RegA+ and RegCF

On 04 March 2020, the US Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) has laid out the proposed changes that are going to have a major impact on the private capital markets.  This is very positive for the market. These changes have been in the works for a number of years and many in the industry have advocated for these changes that are now materializing.

The Commission proposed revisions to the current offering and investment limits for certain exemptions. 

Regulation Crowdfunding (RegCF): 

  • raise the offering limit in Regulation Crowdfunding from $1.07 million to $5 million;

This is going to benefit the 44+ online RegCF platforms such as;  Republic, Wefunder, StartEngine, Flashfunders, EquityFund, NextSeed.   These online platforms have paved the way and now more US-based companies will be able to capitalize on this expanded RegCF limit.  

Regulation A (RegA+) 

  • raise the maximum offering amount under Tier 2 of Regulation A from $50 million to $75 million; and
  • raise the maximum offering amount for secondary sales under Tier 2 of Regulation A from $15 million to $22.5 million.

As you saw in our recent announcement of our RegA+ all-in-one investment platform, we expect more companies to now start using RegA+ for their offerings and they need a partner that can deliver an end-to-end solution.   www.koreconx.io/RegA

These two changes are momentous and will have far-reaching consequences in democratizing capital and make it very efficient for companies to raise capital. This also increases the shareholder base, which makes it even more important for companies to have a cost-effective end-to-end solution that can manage the complete lifecycle of their securities.

If you want to learn more please visit:

www.KoreConX.io/RegA

Here is the complete news release by the SEC

https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2020-55?utm_source=CCA+Master+List&utm_campaign=40105b558a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_01_02_09_01_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b3d336fbcf-40105b558a-357209445

KoreSummit is honored to have Mr. David Weild IV as its keynote speaker

The first KoreSummit event just got even more interesting. We are thrilled to announce Mr. David Weild IV, the father of the JOBS Act, as our keynote speaker. Weild is currently CEO and Chairman of Weild & Co.

He also gathers the expertise of the most competitive stock markets, as he was a former Vice Chairman and executive committee member of NASDAQ, and spent years running Wall Street investment banking and equity capital markets businesses.

Weild will speak at 1 p.m. at the KoreSummit New York. This is an invite-only event. Seats are limited, but you can still apply to attend here: https://koresummit.io/apply/