What is a Burn Rate?

Recently, we received a question from an issuer, asking what a burn rate is. We believe that education is an essential part of the capital raising process, so don’t hesitate to reach out to our team with any questions that could help you along your capital raising journey.

 

The word “burn rate” gets thrown around a lot in the realm of startups and early-stage businesses. But what exactly does it mean, and why is it so important? In this blog post, we’ll explore the ins and outs of burn rate, including what it is, why it matters, and how you can keep it under control.

 

Simply put, the burn rate is the rate at which a company is losing money. It takes into account the company’s operating expenses and revenue, measuring it monthly. This metric shows how much cash a company needs to continue operating for a certain period of time. For example, if a company has monthly expenses of $100,000 and revenue of $50,000, its burn rate is $50,000 per month. This means that the company is losing $50,000 each month, and if nothing changes, it will run out of cash in two months. It’s important to note that the burn rate can fluctuate based on several factors, including:

 

  • Investments in development
  • Advertising and marketing costs
  • Research and development costs
  • Operating expenses (e.g., wages, rent, etc.)

 

By monitoring the burn rate, businesses can make informed decisions about how to use their resources and budget.

 

Why is Burn Rate Important?

 

Understanding and managing burn rate is crucial for any startup or early-stage business. A high burn rate suggests that a company is depleting its cash supply at a rapid pace, which puts it at a higher risk of entering a state of financial distress. This can have serious consequences for investors, who may need to set more aggressive deadlines for the company to realize revenue, or inject more cash into the business to provide more time to reach profitability.

 

Conversely, a low burn rate can indicate that a company has a stronger financial position and are in a better position to become profitable. Low burn rates are also more attractive to investors since their investments can go further.

 

Keeping Burn Rate Under Control

 

Now that we understand the importance of burn rate, let’s look at some strategies for managing it effectively.

 

Layoffs and Pay Cuts: If a company is experiencing a high burn rate, investors may seek to reduce expenses on employee compensation. While layoffs and pay cuts are never easy, they can help a company achieve a leaner strategy and reduce operating expenses.

 

Growth: One way to reduce the burn rate is to project an increase in growth that will improve economies of scale. For example, some startups are currently in a loss-generating scenario, but investors continue to fund them to achieve future profitability.

 

Marketing: Investing in marketing can help a company grow and expand its user base or product use. However, startups are often constrained by limited resources and budgets, making paid advertising a challenge. Instead, they can use low-cost or no-cost tactics to achieve growth, such as email marketing or social media.

 

Burn rate is a crucial metric for any startup or early-stage business. By understanding and managing it effectively, companies can improve their financial health and position themselves for long-term success. Whether it’s reducing staff or compensation, investing in growth, or using low-cost marketing tactics, there are a variety of strategies for keeping the burn rate in check. And for investors, keeping a close eye on the burn rate can help you make informed decisions about funding and supporting startups.

What is Phishing?

No one thinks they’ll fall victim to a cybercrime, but in reality, you’ve likely come across a suspicious email that could be trying to steal login credentials, financial information, or your identity or install dangerous computer viruses. Maybe you’ve received an email that claims to be from Netflix or Amazon, requesting your password, account email, payment information, or other personal information and directing you to an unfamiliar website. These characteristics are the hallmarks of a classic phishing attack, which can lead to identity theft, credit card fraud, ransomware attacks, and more. 

 

Where Did Phishing Come From?

 

The history of phishing dates back to the mid-1990s, when groups of hackers posed as AOL employees and used the instant messaging platform to steal passwords and login credentials. The purpose of these attacks was to use the hijacked accounts to access the internet, rather than pay for access once the 30-day free trial of AOL expired. These hackers were known as “phreaks”, a group of individuals who had a keen interest in studying telecommunication systems. The name “phishing” was used to link these scams to this community.

 

In the early 2000s, hackers began to branch out past AOL accounts to target financial systems to steal credit card information and passwords. Since then, the prevalence of phishing scams has grown exponentially, with 36% of data breaches involving a phishing attack, according to a Verizon report. Between 2021 and 2022 alone, the number of malicious phishing emails grew by 569%, according to cybersecurity company Cofense.

 

How Phishing Works

 

In modern phishing attacks, many hackers use spoofing to disguise an email address, website, phone number, or sender name in the hopes that it will appear legitimate. It could be as simple as changing a number, letter, or symbol so that the URL a hacker is using, without close inspection, is coming from a legitimate source. This will often trick victims into disclosing sensitive information like passwords or credit card numbers, which are then stolen by the hackers. 

 

Protecting Yourself

 

Luckily, there are easy steps to protect yourself against phishing attacks. According to the FBI, companies generally will not contact you asking for your username or password. If you receive an email, text, or phone call requesting this information, that should be a significant red flag. If you receive an unsolicited email with a link, avoid clicking on it. Instead, carefully examine the sender’s name, email address, spelling, and other details about the correspondence to see if there are slight inaccuracies that could point to it being a phishing scam. And, if an email asks you to download something or open an attachment, do not do so unless you can verify that the sender and attachment are legitimate. Also, be wary of the information you share online. Details like birthdays, pet names, schools you attended, and other personal details can be used to guess passwords. 

 

The Importance of Verification

 

Ultimately, the confirmation of someone’s identity can help to avoid potential scams. This can be achieved in the private capital markets by complying with securities regulations. For investors, due diligence and careful research of investment opportunities can highlight potential red flags that could be a telling sign of something too good to be true. At the same time, verifying the identity of a company raising money can provide assurance that it is a legitimate investment opportunity. For issuers, identity verification like AML and KYC confirm that investors are who they claim to be. 

 

Being on the lookout for phishing can help protect your identity and financial information from hackers. Understanding what these scams are and how they work is one of the best defenses available. Stay tuned for the next article in this series, which will shed light on a different type of scam. If you have any questions or topics you’d like to see discussed in more detail, please reach out and share your ideas with us!

My Company is Based in Canada: Can I Use RegCF to Raise Capital?

Recently, we received a question from an issuer, asking if Canadian companies can use RegCF to raise capital. We believe that education is an essential part of the capital raising process, so don’t hesitate to reach out to our team with any questions that could help you along your capital raising journey.

 

Crowdfunding is a popular way for small businesses, startups, and entrepreneurs to raise capital without necessarily needing the support of venture capitalists or angel investors. Regulation Crowdfunding (RegCF) provides an avenue for companies to legally raise capital through equity crowdfunding in the United States and is regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). 

 

Although RegCF is available to US companies, many Canadian companies have questions regarding whether they can also use this exemption to raise capital. This article will answer those questions and provide insight into the legal requirements and structures that work for Canadian companies.

 

Legal Requirements for Raising Capital Through RegCF in Canada

 

In short, the answer is yes, Canadian companies can use RegCF. However, certain requirements must be met for a company outside of the U.S. to take raise capital through this exemption.

 

The main legal requirement is that the company must establish a US entity, such as a corporation or a limited liability company (LLC), which will be managed from within the U.S. The SEC states that “the issuer’s officers, partners, or managers must primarily direct, control, and coordinate its activities from the U.S., and its principal place of business must be in the U.S.”

 

It is also recommended that Canadian companies considering using RegCF to raise capital should provide evidence of their plans to engage the US market. This could include investing in marketing and advertising initiatives, setting up offices or physical locations within the US, hiring personnel from the US, etc.

 

Using RegCF in Canada

 

There are a few different ways that Canadian businesses approach a RegCF offering. One option is to create a wholly-owned subsidiary in the United States that will operate the business and raise funds through RegCF. This subsidiary must have its own business plan and financials, and cannot simply be a shell company. Alternatively, Canadian companies can create a US-based holding company that will own the Canadian entity and operate the business in both countries. This structure can be beneficial for companies looking to expand their operations into the US market while also raising capital from US-based investors. Canadian companies can also create a new US-based company that licenses the product or service of the Canadian company. 

 

Ultimately, a Canadian company seeking to raise capital using RegCF must create a US-based entity with a primary place of business in the US. The company raising capital cannot simply be a shell company that directs capital raised back to the parent company.

 

Alternatives for Canadian Companies

 

There are several other options for raising capital for Canadian companies that cannot or do not wish to use RegCF. These include traditional venture capital and angel investing, as well as debt financing from banks and other lenders. Additionally, many Canadian provinces have their own provincial securities commissions that offer exemptions from the registration requirements for businesses looking to raise funds from investors within their jurisdiction. But because of RegCF’s benefits of allowing companies to advertise offerings, as well as its low minimum investment requirements, it is certainly worth considering for Canadian businesses looking to raise capital.

 

Deciding whether or not to use RegCF for a Canadian company is ultimately a decision that should be made on a case-by-case basis. Although US securities laws may present some additional regulations, there are many benefits to using this platform if it is done properly. The ability to access capital from a larger pool of investors, as well as the streamlined process of RegCF, can make it an attractive option for Canadian businesses looking to raise funds.  Ultimately, Canadian companies should discuss their capital raising options with a securities attorney if they have questions about the process and their options.

April Investment Crowdfunding Sees Near-Record Levels

The last couple of months have been a turbulent time for the financial sector. In March, we first saw the collapse of Silicon Valley Bank, the largest bank by deposits in Silicon Valley and favored by tech startups. This was followed a couple of days later by the collapse of Signature Bank. The third collapse this year was that of First Republic Bank, the largest banking failure since the financial crisis in 2008. These events have been coupled with stagnation in the venture capital market that has highlighted the stability of the investment crowdfunding industry. Ultimately, April demonstrated a resilient interest in investment crowdfunding.

 

Investment Crowdfunding Proves Appetite for Deals

 

In a recent newsletter, Sherwood Neiss, Principal at Crowdfund Capital Advisors, was quoted saying, “A large amount of capital and number of investors flowing into Investment Crowdfunding offers proves that there is a massive appetite for these deals.” Neiss continues, “While there might have been fewer deals in April, the reality is startups still need capital, and Investment Crowdfunding is where they will find it. We expect to start to see an uptick in deals in May as these issuers realize opportunity exists here.” 

 

Investment Crowdfunding Sees a Decline in New Deals, Rise in Capital Commitments

 

In April, there was a decline in new deals, with only 91 being launched, compared to 147 in March 2023. This marked the lowest number of crowdfunding deals since June 2020. However, capital commitments reached an impressive $65.4 million in April, the second-highest level of commitment since March 2021, when investment crowdfunding was reaching a high point of interest during the pandemic. 

 

There were also 54 issuers that raised over $1 million each during April, while six raised the maximum of $5 million. With the 54 issuers that closed their raise during the month bringing in an impressive $131 million, it was the second-highest monthly close of capital, despite ongoing challenges faced by the private capital markets. 

 

More Investors are Making Investment Decisions

 

The number of checks written by investors in April 2023 increased by 92.9% compared to the prior month but dropped by 4% compared to the prior year. The average check size dropped to $1,174 in April 2023 due to a large number of active deals compared to March. 

 

The investment crowdfunding industry is growing rapidly and shows no signs of slowing down. As investors become more comfortable with deploying capital in private markets, despite current challenges in the private market, it will only continue to fuel this growth trend.

 

What is an Escrow Provider?

If you’ve bought a home, you’ve likely heard the term escrow. In the homebuying process, escrow can be used to hold a good faith deposit while the contract is being finalized. It can also be used after the home is purchased to pay for property taxes, homeowners insurance, or mortgage insurance. In these instances, money held in escrow is managed by an independent, third-party intermediary. However, escrow is also common during the process of investing in a company, where the escrow provider takes custody of funds and assets until specific transaction conditions are met. But what exactly is the role of an escrow provider in a transaction? What responsibilities do they have? And when should they be utilized? 

Keep reading and learn more!

 

What is an Escrow Provider?

 

An escrow provider is an independent third-party intermediary which ensures that a transaction is completed in accordance with the rules of the agreement. An escrow provider collects, holds, and distributes funds on behalf of the individuals involved in a transaction. The help of certified escrow providers ensures that both parties meet their obligations and bring confidence to complete a transaction reliably. 

 

In many cases, the buyer and seller agree to use an escrow provider for several advantages, such as:

 

  • Mitigating the risk of nonpayment or fraud
  • Ensuring that all funds are securely handled
  • Being an impartial third party to the transaction

 

The process when utilizing an escrow provider generally includes:

 

  • Creating a contract outlining the obligations of the buyer and seller
  • Depositing funds into an escrow account
  • Ensuring that all conditions of the agreement are met before releasing funds

 

At the same time, technology can play an important role in the escrow process. For example, smart contracts that leverage blockchain technology can be programmed to automatically transfer assets between two parties once the conditions of the contract have been met. This can automate some of the escrow process, which can help to streamline the escrow process.

 

JOBS Act and Escrow

 

The Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act has since become a major factor in creating a secure capital-raising environment in the private capital markets. To raise capital, issuers must follow securities regulations to ensure compliance in the capital-raising process. This provides an additional layer of protection for investors and startups raising capital.

 

An essential component of compliance includes finding an escrow provider to administer transactions. This ensures that all funds are handled securely and that a third-party intermediary manages the transaction. Putting investors and issuers at ease by bringing peace of mind to the transaction. 

 

Escrow providers are essential for any type of business transaction where an impartial third-party intermediary is involved. With an increase in accredited and nonaccredited investors alike being involved in the private capital markets thanks to the JOBS Act, it is crucial to ensure that one is involved in the capital raising process.

Whether you are an investor or issuer, using an escrow provider guarantees all funds are handled correctly while avoiding financial risk or fraud. 

 

To ensure your escrow process is handled with the highest level of security and compliance, check out KoreConX. Their advanced platform supports all your private capital market needs, providing peace of mind for both issuers and investors. Book a call with our experts and learn more.

Shedding Light on the Secondary Market

The private capital market is an important component of the economy and has seen considerable growth since the JOBS Act exemptions came into play. However, the public markets have the advantage of a strong underlying infrastructure, one that existed long before the advent of the Internet (the first public company was the Dutch East India Company which began stock trading in the early 1600s). In contrast, the private markets historically have fewer options for liquidity other than an exit or an IPO. 

 

Technological advancements have had a profound impact on the secondary market, transforming the way trading is conducted through the use of electronic systems for order delivery and execution. On the public side, entities like the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq have automated many functions that streamline the process of buying and selling stocks. In addition, broker-dealers and institutional investors have been leveraging powerful computer systems and sophisticated applications to manage inventory, order flow, and risk while receiving market data, research reports, and company information electronically. 

 

In the private market, alternative trading systems (ATSs) have emerged to let investors sell or buy shares on a secondary market. For example, anyone who has invested through RegA+ is then able to transact on the secondary market if the issuer has permitted that option. Still, there are many issues that face the private market. The unfortunate reality is that while a fragmented regulatory environment does allow for some secondary market transactions, issuers are not pre-empted from state securities regulations. 

 

The private capital market is beginning to catch up with the public market in terms of technological advancements, with companies seeking to create digital infrastructure and platforms for the private market. However, to truly unlock liquidity in the secondary markets of the private capital market, there needs to be an overarching system that enables buyers and sellers to identify potential trades quickly, securely, and with full transparency on the secondary market.

 

The lack of visibility in information is a key issue inhibiting secondary marketing trading in the private capital markets. Solving these issues will unlock a huge opportunity for buyers and sellers. To do this, there needs to be an underlying infrastructure similar to that which exists in the public market, allowing companies to quickly and securely connect with potential buyers and sellers, as well as gain access to real-time information about the secondary market. With the right technology in place, this could open up unprecedented opportunities for liquidity in the private capital markets that have long been “dark”.

Why the Private Capital Markets are Outpacing the Public Markets

The private capital market has seen considerable growth over the past few years due to geopolitical tensions, inflation, and interest rate hikes. These factors are driving heightened volatility in public markets, and investors are therefore looking for protection in private market deals. The ability for private companies to raise capital with accredited and nonaccredited investors through regulations like RegCF and RegA+ has also added to this growth.

 

Large Pool of Capital

 

The private capital market is also benefiting from a large pool of capital currently available to investors. According to Preqin, global private capital dry powder stood at around $1.96 trillion in December 2022. Dry powder is the cash that has been committed by investors but has not yet been “called” by investment managers to be allocated for a specific investment. This sizable reserve of money, when deployed, will provide an influx of investment into the private markets.

 

Growth & Flexibility

 

Companies are also opting to stay private for longer durations of time. In 2011, companies typically stayed private for five years before going public. As of 2020, this has extended to a time period of 11 years. Remaining private can give companies greater flexibility as they grow their business. They may find it easier to adapt and make changes in the early stages with private capital, before choosing a public route when they are more mature and established. With the ability to earn up to $75 million in 12 months with RegA+, for example, the ability for private companies to raise capital is unprecedented in the sector. 

 

The Shift from Public Markets to Private Capital Markets

 

This trend is likely to continue into 2023 and beyond as investors seek alternatives to the public markets. As such, understanding the implications of this shift from public to private is essential for any investor looking to capitalize on these opportunities. Private companies are looking to stay private longer because:

 

  • It allows them to keep their business strategies under wraps and maintain control over key decisions.
  • They can gain access to more capital at a lower cost compared to public markets, allowing for accelerated growth.
  • The private capital market has more flexible structures and less regulation compared with the public markets.

 

Private vs Public Market Size

 

McKinsey estimates that in North America, private market fundraising grew by 21% between 2020 and 2021. In the United States alone, there were 7,042,866 private companies. In comparison, there were only 4,000 public companies in the United States as of 2020. These statistics highlight the significant impact that businesses have on the world economy, with diverse markets and industries contributing to growth and prosperity.

 

The private capital market is rapidly outpacing the public market and this trend looks set to continue into 2023. As private companies continue to significantly outnumber public companies, the increase of capital raising opportunities will only help this sector to grow.

What is a Board of Directors?

Recently, we received a question from an issuer, asking to explain what a board of directors is. We believe that education is an essential part of the capital raising process, so don’t hesitate to reach out to our team with any questions that could help you along your capital raising journey.

 

Without further ado, this article will explore the role of a board of directors and the critical role they play within a company. The board of directors serves as the “operating mind” of the company – providing oversight to shareholders, officers, and employees alike. More importantly, boards can be utilized as a tool to mitigate risk when raising capital. This is because a board of directors typically has experience addressing issues that include:

 

  • Strategic direction
  • Corporate governance
  • Independence and accountability

 

What is a Board of Directors?

 

A board of directors, or ‘board’ is the highest governing body of a company. It is responsible for oversight and providing direction to the organization. The board consists of members who are elected by shareholders, normally on an annual basis. These members act as representatives of shareholders and their interests, ensuring that the company is managed properly. Public companies are required to have a board of directors, and while the same is not true for private companies, many still choose to do so.

 

The Need for a Board of Directors

 

The board of directors plays a vital role in ensuring the company is run correctly and its goals are met. The board works to ensure that any decisions made by the company are in line with shareholders’ interests, such as profitability and value preservation. A board also protects shareholders from potential risks associated with investing, such as fraud or mismanagement. In addition, having a board of directors can help to ensure that the company is making responsible decisions and staying compliant with legal and regulatory requirements. The board also helps to prevent self-dealing by executive officers or other members of management, as well as helping to set policy for the organization. 

 

One of the main benefits of having a board of directors is its ability to provide risk mitigation when raising capital. The presence of an independent board can demonstrate to investors that the company has taken steps to protect their interests and show potential investors that there is a competent and experienced group looking after their investments. It is important to distinguish between a board of directors and the other roles within a company. Officers are usually C-level executives who report directly to the board when making decisions regarding how the company operates. 

 

Early-Stage Companies and the Single-Person Corporation

 

For start-ups or early-stage companies, it is common for one person to wear multiple hats. In these instances, an entrepreneur likely serves as both an officer and a board member, making decisions from both perspectives. However, this differs from larger corporations who usually have more members on their boards, to ensure that the company is managed properly. As the company grows, so does the importance of electing an independent board.

 

Tools to Mitigate Risk When Raising Capital

 

When it comes to raising capital, boards must have access to certain tools to manage risk. This includes a minute book, cap table, and other documents which provide information about how the company is operating. By having access to this information, boards can minimize the risk of investors losing their money. With the advent of digital technologies that streamline this data management, board directors can have real-time access to company data that allows them to make informed decisions.

 

From start-ups to larger corporations, boards of directors play an important role in managing risk and providing oversight. Ultimately, having a board of directors is an important aspect of the capital raising process that can provide investors additional confidence in an investment after completing their due diligence.

How Do I Build a Community for My Company?

What is a community? The word can be defined as “a body of persons of common and especially professional interests scattered through a larger society” or “a group of people with a common characteristic or interest living together within a larger society.” Putting this into a bit more context, picture a beaver in the forest, building a dam. This seemingly simple, instinctual event has a profound effect on the surrounding area. The dam forms a pond, which creates the perfect habitat for a diverse range of animals, insects, and other organisms, while also improving the water conditions. 

 

This beaver is much like an entrepreneur building a business. As the business grows, it provides employment opportunities, creates a network of suppliers and partners, develops relationships with customers, and is supported by shareholders. They all play a crucial role in the success of your business. 

 

By nurturing these relationships, especially in today’s highly competitive business environment, this community can help increase engagement, loyalty, and interest in your company, which can translate into more investment and business opportunities down the road.

 

Recognizing the Benefits of a Strong Community

 

From customers to employees and suppliers, building a community around your company can bring numerous benefits. A thriving and engaging community can create:

 

  • Increased customer or employee loyalty: When customers and employees feel a sense of belonging and loyalty to your brand, they are more likely to remain loyal for longer. This can result in higher rates of retention, as well as increased referrals and advocacy.
  • Improved engagement with stakeholders: A thriving community can help you engage with key stakeholders such as investors, partners, and suppliers. This can help to foster stronger relationships over time, leading to better deals and collaborations.
  • Increased brand reputation: A community of loyal customers or employees can promote your brand integrity and trustworthiness, which is essential for building a successful business.
  • More growth opportunities: With a strong network of loyal loyal customers and employees, you’ll have a larger pool of potential buyers or investors when you are looking to grow.
  • A foundation for investors: Ultimately, when you’re looking to raise capital or attract investors, having a strong community of engaged stakeholders around your company can be an invaluable asset by providing evidence of your brand’s trustworthiness and potential. These stakeholders can also become valuable investors that share in your vision for the future.

 

Ultimately, cultivating this community requires transparency and compliance to build trust and instill confidence. But how do you go about building a community for your company? 

 

6 Tips for Building a Community

 

1. Understand Your Audience

 

The first step in building a community is to understand your audience. Who are the people you want to attract and engage with? What are their needs, wants, and interests? What motivates them to invest in your company? By creating customer personas and conducting market research, you can get a better understanding of your target audience. This can help you tailor your messaging, content, and engagement strategies to better resonate with your community.

 

2. Focus on Transparency and Communication

 

Transparency and open communication are essential ingredients for building a strong community. Shareholders, employees, and customers all want to feel like they have a voice and that their concerns are being heard. This is especially important when it comes to managing shareholder relationships. To build trust and transparency, consider implementing regular communication channels like newsletters, social media updates, and webinars. Make a point of responding to customer and shareholder feedback promptly and thoroughly.

 

3. Leverage Technology

 

Technology can be a powerful tool in building and managing your community. Consider investing in a customer relationship management (CRM) system to track and manage your customer interactions. This can help you identify patterns and trends in customer behavior, enabling you to tailor your messaging and engagement strategies to better resonate with your community.

Social media platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter can also be powerful tools for building and engaging with your community. Regularly update your social media channels with relevant content, respond to customer feedback and comments, and use social media analytics to track engagement and identify opportunities to better connect with your community.

 

4. Create Meaningful Content

 

Creating high-quality, engaging content is another key element in building a community. Content can come in many different forms, including blog posts, videos, webinars, eBooks, and more. The key is to create content that is tailored specifically to your target audience and resonates with them on an emotional level. This will help you build relationships and foster loyalty among your customers, employees, and shareholders.

 

5. Foster and Incentivize Engagement

 

Engaging your community is an important part of building relationships and developing loyalty. Consider running contests, giveaways, or other promotional activities to incentivize engagement. You can also create loyalty programs or rewards systems to further reward customer engagement.

 

6. Gather Around a Cause

 

When building a strong community creates a sense of purpose around your company. Find something that your customers, employees, and shareholders can all rally behind. This should be something bigger than just making money – it could be related to sustainability, philanthropy, or another cause the community can get behind. By giving people something to believe in, you can create a sense of shared identity that will bring your community together. 

 

When it comes to raising capital, you should also focus on creating experiences that make investors feel appreciated and valued. For example, you could offer exclusive investor-only events or create a private investment platform where invited investors can access exclusive content about your company and its opportunities. 

 

Regardless of how you approach it, building a thriving community around your business is essential to growing and scaling effectively. This will lead to increased loyalty, greater investment opportunities, and higher long-term returns. By taking these key steps to develop a strong community around your business, you’ll be well on your way to achieving your capital-raising goals.

 

Small Businesses and Their Economic Success

Small businesses have always been an integral part of the economy, contributing to job creation and economic growth. Over the last decade, small businesses have faced a variety of challenges, including economic downturns, government regulations, and evolving consumer preferences. Despite these difficulties, small businesses have continued to play a significant role in driving economic success. In this blog, we’ll examine the level of success small businesses have achieved in the economy over the last decade and how JOBS Act regulations have impacted this success.

 

The Role of Small Businesses in the Economy

 

Small businesses are often referred to as the backbone of the economy. According to the US Small Business Administration (SBA), small businesses account for 44 percent of US economic activity and employ nearly half of the country’s private sector workforce. In fact, there are 33.2 million small businesses in the United States and they created 8.7 million jobs created between March 2020 and March 2021. Small businesses also contribute to innovation and competition in the marketplace, which in turn drives economic growth

 

Small Business Challenges and Successes

 

Over the last decade, small businesses have faced a variety of challenges, including the great recession, rising costs, and increased competition from online retailers. Despite these challenges, small businesses have continued to achieve success in the economy. With eight out of ten small businesses having no employees and 16% of small businesses having up to 19 employees, this sector of the economy is mostly driven by individuals who can take risks and innovate for growth.

 

Meaning, small business growth often depends on entrepreneurs’ risk-taking capability and ability to identify profitable opportunities. Additionally, the passage of the JOBS Act in 2012 has enabled small businesses to access capital more easily than ever before. The act allows businesses to raise money from investors without having to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). This allows smaller organizations that are still private to raise millions of dollars in capital while tapping into a much wider pool of potential investors.

 

The Impact of JOBS Act Regulations on Small Business Success

 

The JOBS Act allows companies to use SEC exemptions from registration, which include:

 

  • Reg CF to raise up to $5 million
  • Reg A to raise up to $75 million
  • Reg D to raise an unlimited amount of capital

 

These capital-raising methods allow small businesses to access a much wider pool of potential investors, obtain higher levels of capital, and achieve greater success in the economy. By allowing organizations to tap into an audience of investors they would have not had access to previously, the JOBS Act has enabled small businesses to build relationships with their customers, grow their operations, and create good jobs in local economies. With the continued support of government regulations and technological advancements, small businesses are poised to play an even greater role in driving economic success in the years to come.

5 Things You Need to Know About Transfer Agents

When a company issues securities, it is vital to keep the official record of ownership and distribution accurate and up-to-date at all times. This process is managed by transfer agents who in addition to assuming responsibility for maintaining accurate records of security transactions, can also handle shareholder inquiries, distribute shareholder materials, and more. In this blog post, we will discuss the five critical things that companies need to know about transfer agents before embarking on their next capital raise.

 

1. Protecting Issuers and Investors

 

Transfer agents protect issuers and investors by ensuring that the issuance of securities maintains a high degree of accuracy and reliability, and is consistent with the applicable regulations, thereby protecting both the issuer and the investor from the risk of disputes and expensive litigation. Transfer agents play a critical role in maintaining the integrity of the security issuance process, closely monitoring any changes in ownership or other company-specific details. This helps to prevent fraudulent activities such as double ownership or over-issuance of securities.

 

2. Issuing and Canceling Certificates

 

Another crucial function of transfer agents is to issue or cancel certificates reflecting shareholder ownership in the company, to ensure that the shareholders receive accurate documentation of their investment. The certificates are tangible evidence that shareholders own securities in the company and that they have the right to vote or receive dividends. Transfer agents must also cancel and decommission certificates to reflect trades or company-specific events such as stock splits, mergers, or acquisitions. Canceling or decommissioning certificates is a vital task in maintaining a current and accurate representation of who owns what within the company.

 

3. Managing the Cap Table

 

Transfer agents play a crucial role in managing the cap table. The cap table is the official record of the ownership structure of the company, including the number of shares held and who holds them. It is essential to manage the cap table effectively to avoid conflicts, confusion, or discrepancies among shareholders. The transfer agent ensures that the cap table stays up to date with any changes that may occur due to equity issuances or mergers and acquisition activity involving the company. The effectiveness of the cap table management is critical for companies raising capital or going through mergers and acquisitions, for helping investors conduct their own due diligence, and for tracking the company’s overall value and growth.

 

4. Legal Compliance

 

Another significant responsibility of transfer agents is ensuring the company’s compliance with specific securities laws and regulations. The transfer agent makes sure that the company is aware of and adhering to the legislative guidelines and rules governing the issuance and transfer of securities. Transfer agents must comply with both federal and state regulations, making this a complex task. Companies need to work closely with their transfer agents to ensure they are clear on aspects of the legal requirements that affect their business. Navigating the regulatory landscape can be daunting, but a transfer agent can help make it smoother for companies.

 

5. Investor Relations

Finally, transfer agents are essential for providing service to shareholders. Often, they are the first point of contact when shareholders have questions, concerns, or problems that require resolution. They help to answer any inquiries shareholders may have and maintain a clear line of communication. Excellent customer service is key to maintaining a positive relationship with shareholders. Shareholders who feel valued are more likely to remain invested in the company and can become valuable brand ambassadors. This, in turn, can lead to more significant investments in the company, improving overall shareholder value.

A transfer agent plays a critical role in ensuring that securities transactions are processed accurately and reliably, protecting the interests of the issuer and the investor. Using an experienced and knowledgeable transfer agent has many valuable benefits for companies. They provide companies with a comprehensive solution for managing securities issuances, maintaining shareholder relationships, and navigating the complex regulatory landscape. Transfer agents are an essential part of the securities industry, and companies who work with them are better positioned to succeed.

Approaching the 11th Anniversary of the JOBS Act

Eleven years ago, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act was signed into law in a White House Rose Garden ceremony. Looking back on this landmark legislation, we see its impact has been far-reaching. From increased access to capital for small businesses to the rise of new markets for investment opportunities, the JOBS Act has reshaped how companies raise funds and spur economic growth. In 2022, $150.9 B was raised through Regulations A+, CF, and D, showcasing the tremendous power of these regulations for companies. As we mark the 11th anniversary of this game-changing law, let’s look at what it has accomplished and how it is (still) changing the capital formation landscape.

 

David Wield: The Father of the JOBS Act

 

David Weild IV is a veteran Wall Street executive and advisor to U.S. and international capital markets. He has become well known as a champion of small business as the “Father of the JOBS Act”. Signed into law by President Barack Obama in April 2012, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act has opened up access to capital markets, giving small businesses and startups the ability to raise money from a much larger pool of investors. Wield has remarked that this was not a political action; it was signed in “an incredibly bipartisan fashion, which is really a departure from what we’ve generally seen. It actually increases economic activity. It’s good for poor people, good for rich people. And it adds to the US Treasury”.

 

As such, Weild is seen as a leading figure in the JOBS Act movement, inspiring the startup community to break down barriers and build the future. He has helped make it easier for companies to become public, empowering a new generation of entrepreneurs looking to start or grow their businesses. Furthermore, Weild’s efforts have allowed more investors to participate in capital markets.

 

Benefitting from the JOBS Act

 

At the inception of the JOBS Act in 2012, non-accredited investors were only allowed to invest up to $2,000 or 5% of their net worth per year. This was designed to protect non-accredited investors from taking on too much risk by investing in startups, as these investments would likely be high risk and high reward. Since then, the JOBS Act has expanded to allow non-accredited investors to invest up to 10% of their net worth or $107,000 per year in startups and private placements.  

 

For companies they were initially allowed to raise:

 

  • Up to $50 million in RegA+ offerings
  • $1 million through crowdfunding (RegCF)
  • Unlimited capital from accredited investors under RegD

 

These numbers have grown significantly since 2012, with:

 

  • Reg A allowing $75 million to be raised
  • Reg CF allowing $5 million to be raised

 

These rules have opened the door for startups to access large amounts of capital that otherwise may not have been available to them. This has allowed more companies to grow, innovate and create jobs in the U.S.

 

How Much has Been Raised with JOBS Act Regulations?

 

The JOBS Act regulations have revolutionized how capital is raised by companies and how investors access new markets. According to Crowdfund Insider, companies have raised:

 

  • $1.8 Billion from July 2021 to June 2022 with RegA+
  • $2.3 trillion with RegD 506(B)
  • $148 trillion with RegD 506(C)
  • $506.7 million with RegCF

 

Since its formation in 2012, the JOBS Act has opened up a variety of avenues for entrepreneurs to access capital. The exempt offering ecosystem has allowed innovators to raise large sums of money with relatively fewer requirements than a traditional public offering, while still requiring compliance and offering investors protection. This has enabled companies to stay in business and grow, allowing the US economy to remain competitive on the global stage.

 

Insights from Industry Leaders

 

Expanding the discussion about capital formation, KoreConX launched its podcast series, KoreTalkX in April 2022. Through this platform, we’ve hosted many thought leaders and experts to share their insights on capital-raising strategies and compliance regulations. Guests have included renowned thought leaders including David Weild, Jason Fishman, Shari Noonan, Joel Steinmetz, Jonny Price, Douglas Ruark, Sara Hanks, and many others. Each of these episodes has explored topics in-depth to provide entrepreneurs with the tools they need to be successful when raising capital from investors.

Reforms to RegD

With Regulation D (RegD) offerings, companies are exempt from registering securities with the SEC. Under RegD, companies can raise capital from accredited investors (and a limited number of nonaccredited investors in some cases) to support the growth of their business. This has become a popular method for private companies to raise capital, and can often be a starting point for larger capital raises under Regulation CF or Regulation A+. This popularity and the minimal disclosure requirements of RegD have prompted SEC Commissioner Caroline A. Crenshaw to propose changes to RegD disclosure requirements in January. Let’s see about these reforms to RegD.

 

Current Regulations Under RegD

 

The objective of RegD was to enable small and medium-sized businesses to seek capital-raising opportunities, without the cost-prohibitive disclosure requirements of a public offering. Under current regulation, companies may make private offerings of securities without having to register with the SEC, provided that they comply with certain disclosure requirements. These include filing Form D (which provides information about a company’s executives and its financial condition) and providing investors with a private placement memorandum outlining the terms of the offering. However, as this method of capital raising has been leveraged by multi-billion-dollar companies for whom it was not originally intended, the SEC is looking to update the disclosure requirements.

 

Commissioner Crenshaw’s Proposed Reforms

 

Commissioner Crenshaw has proposed a two-tiered framework, similar to Regulation A (RegA) which also provides an exemption from SEC registration requirements. Under the proposed reforms, companies offering securities through RegD would be required to provide more disclosure than is currently required, with the burden of disclosure increasing based on company size. Smaller companies (up to a threshold) would only need to provide basic information about their business operations such as management, operational updates, and financial statements. Larger companies (over the threshold) would be required to provide additional, heightened financial disclosures similar to those that are required under an S-1 filing. 

 

This reform could have far-reaching implications for small and medium businesses that wish to access capital markets and would largely depend on where the threshold is set. It remains to be seen whether these proposed reforms will move forward, but it’s clear that Commissioner Crenshaw is interested in modernizing and streamlining the process of raising capital.  

 

Effects of These Changes

 

The SEC’s proposed reforms would require issuers to provide more extensive disclosure and adhere to certain standards that are typically only associated with public offerings. This could potentially be a costly endeavor, as it would involve additional filing fees, legal expenses, and accounting costs.

 

The proposed reforms could also limit the ability of small businesses to access capital through Regulation D, as the costs associated with meeting the new requirements may be too high for some companies. For example, smaller companies may find it difficult to pay for the necessary accounting and legal fees, or they may not be able to generate enough interest from investors due to the higher thresholds that must be met to qualify for RegD. Small start-ups trying to raise only $250,000, these companies may not have the money to prepare the audited financials and Form 1A level disclosures.

The SEC’s proposed reforms of Regulation D are a step in the right direction toward protecting investors and ensuring that issuers adhere to certain standards. However, these reforms could potentially be harmful to small businesses seeking to raise capital through RegD offerings. The SEC needs to consider the potential effects of its proposed reforms and ensure that they are not overly burdensome on companies whose access to capital is already limited.

 

7 Things You Need to Raise Capital Online in 2023

. ising capital online can be a great way to a vast pool of potential investors. With the JOBS Act exemptions and many online funding portals available, it’s easier than ever to get started. Here are 7 Things You Need to Raise Capital Online in 2023.

 

1. Know Your Options

 

From Regulation D 506(c) offerings to RegCF and RegA+ offerings, it’s important to understand the differences between them. Each option has different requirements for time, cost, and resources. Plan accordingly for whatever option you choose by considering the trade-offs. Many issuers start with a RegD, then move on to a RegCF, and then a RegA+ because of the costs and compliance efforts required with each exemption.

 

2. Plan for a Higher Cost of Capital

 

Raising capital can be expensive. Especially when doing so online, you should plan on paying more than you usually would because of the additional costs associated with marketing, platform fees for using a crowdfunding platform, etc. These costs, along with fees for broker-dealers and legal counsel, can add up quickly, but understanding the potential costs will help you to plan accordingly. While raising capital online will cost more than a brokered or VC deal, you will retain greater ownership and control and suffer from less dilution, which may be a valuable tradeoff.

 

3. Find the Best Online Capital-Raising Platform

 

Before you embark on your journey to raise capital online, you need to find the right platform for your needs. You will want to make sure that you are working with the best platform possible. The first step is to do your research and find out which platform suits you best. You should look into the fees each platform charges, their customer service ratings, and whether or not they have any special features such as automated investing tools or portfolios with pre-set risk profiles.


Be wary of platforms that promise unrealistic returns or make promises about how easy it will be to raise capital in a short amount of time. Seek out platforms that have built up a good reputation and are transparent with their fees and services. Platforms do not raise money for you. Be sure to have a clear strategy in place before you launch your capital-raising campaign, and do not use a platform that promises too much. You can explore the list of FINRA-regulated funding platforms
here.

 

4. You’re Responsible for Marketing

 

You’ll need to craft an effective message and have the resources available to get it out there – whether that’s through social media, email campaigns, print ads, or other forms of advertising.  When you sign up for a capital raising platform, they do not help you with marketing or getting investors. This is left up to your organization or you can hire a marketing firm that is experienced in marketing for online capital raises. Ensure you know your target market and audience so that your message resonates with the right people who will invest in your cause or project. Researching trends in the current market can help you refine your strategy over time as well. Focus on building relationships with potential investors by providing value upfront before asking them for anything monetary related – this can go far towards building trust and credibility between both parties when marketing for your capital raise.

 

5. Launch with an Announcement and Target Multiple Investors

 

Announce the closing of your last smaller raise and its success when launching your next round. You can create a sense of urgency that will attract investors and help drive interest in your offering. This proven strategy can be rinsed and repeated as often as needed (though it can be overdone, and your audience will eventually catch on that this isn’t really the last chance to invest). Another way to maximize your chances for success when raising capital online is to target multiple investor types. While it’s important to target self-directed investors online, you can also retain marketing partners to reach out to family offices and institutional investors. By targeting multiple investor types simultaneously, you’ll improve your chances of raising more capital.

 

6. Focus on Marketing and Platforms

 

It is essential to have a well-structured marketing plan. That will help you reach your target audience and create awareness of your offering. It’s also important to focus on choosing the right platform for your capital-raising efforts. Consider your capital-raising goals, the platform you plan to use to meet those goals, and the availability of resources to help you achieve success. Will your campaign primarily use affinity marketing? Or will you utilize tools such as advertising, email campaigns, and social media?

 

7. Get a Valuation Report and a Securities Attorney

 

During the process of raising capital online, understand the value of your assets and make sure that you are compliant with security laws. A 3rd-party valuation report can give you a better understanding of your company’s worth and help inform investors about its potential. These reports are available from many reputable firms, and retaining one can help you to make a more convincing case for the worth of your company. It is also essential to hire a securities attorney to ensure you comply with JOBS Act exemptions. Without a lawyer experienced in securities law on your side, you could be risking legal violations and hefty fines.

 

5 Tips for Frictionless Capital Raising

Raising capital can be a tricky process. Fortunately, with the JOBS Act and its exemptions from SEC registration under RegA+, RegCF, or RegD, entrepreneurs can now access capital raising 24/7/365. Here are five tips to help you make the most of this opportunity and enjoy frictionless capital raising.

Use Mobile Apps for Online Investments

Mobile apps are becoming an increasingly popular way to access capital markets and make investments online. When a company raises capital under a JOBS Act exemption, a mobile app can streamline the investment process for investors. For example, the KoreID Mobile App allows investors to manage current and pending investments and reinvest with ease. KoreID allows investors to securely manage their personal information so that they don’t have to reenter the same information each time they go to invest.

Utilize Affinity Marketing

What better way to raise capital than to leverage your existing network of customers? Customers that align with your company’s mission and values can become powerful brand ambassadors when they invest. This type of marketing also helps give potential investors a sense of trust and familiarity, which can be invaluable when it comes to securing investments. By utilizing affinity marketing, you can easily create an affinity network and unlock new capital-raising opportunities.

Seek the Crowd

Over the last year, the amount of venture capital funding has dropped significantly. Instead, online capital formation facilitated by the JOBS Act has become a powerful player in the private capital market. RegA+ and RegCF allow companies to raise capital from the general public, creating a wider pool of potential investors. And, since online capital raising is open 24/7/365, these sources of capital can be a valuable alternative to traditional funding routes.

Have a Plan and Tailor Your Pitch

Before you even consider approaching potential investors, you should always have an airtight business plan in place. This includes your stated objectives, financial projections, and any other details that provide an in-depth look into your venture. Once you’ve mapped out the specifics of your venture, it’s time to start crafting a tailored pitch that resonates with potential investors. Creating a compelling presentation with the right balance of facts, figures, and storytelling can help draw investors in and establish trust. Think about the investors you are pitching to and tailor your pitch accordingly. Are they venture capitalists and angel investors? Or are you targeting family and friends or seeking equity crowdfunding? Each type of investor has different requirements, so it’s key to understand who you are pitching to and adjust your strategy accordingly. Regardless of who you’re targeting, it’s vital that you fully understand your business plan, because investors will ask you questions that a memorized sales pitch might not answer adequately. By doing this, you can ensure that the capital-raising process is as seamless as possible.

Prioritize Compliance

When raising capital, adhering to securities regulations is essential for success. While there are many components to compliance, using a broker-dealer is one of the first things that any company should consider when raising capital. Broker-dealers can also help you navigate the complexities of securities regulations. By selecting an experienced and reliable broker-dealer, you’ll have peace of mind knowing that the process is compliant and secure. With these raises sometimes having thousands of investors on a cap table, you want to be sure that your investors are managed properly and that your raise is in compliance with the law.

Raising capital for your venture doesn’t have to be a daunting task. By following these five tips for frictionless capital raising, you can make the process as smooth as possible so you can be well on your way to securing the funds needed for growth. 

 

What is TradeCheck?

Through RegA+, RegCF, and RegD, hundreds of companies across the country have been able to raise capital from both retail and accredited investors. The shares held by these investors are freely tradeable (after one year in the case of RegCF or RegD, however, buying and selling these securities requires compliance with a patchwork of regulations that can differ between different jurisdictions.

 

TradeCheck is a solution offered by KoreConX to ensure that state rules governing the resale of unlisted securities are met by providing clarity on state requirements for trading securities, automating compliance checks, and producing reports detailing transactions. TradeCheck is unique in its ability to provide transparency into transaction compliance, helping companies ensure a smooth and compliant trading process. 

 

TradeCheck can be used by all parties involved in a regulation process, including investors, issuers, and intermediaries. To use it, investors simply enter their email addresses into the platform and follow the prompts, where they will be asked to log in with their KoreID and password, and answer a security question before they can access their account. 

 

For issuers, the process begins with KoreConX walking them through the necessary state requirements, and providing a detailed report on which states transactions may be made in and for what time period. Alongside this, the inclusion of the issuer’s information in the Mergent “Securities Manuals” is also a part of this service. Ultimately, TradeCheck helps companies get clearance for all states and territories except California

 

The TradeCheck service also offers additional assurance to the investor or intermediary regarding the correctness of the disclosure available about the company, operating history, and financial statements. This is achieved by providing a third-party audit of the company’s documents to ensure that all the necessary regulations are met. The audit also helps in preventing any fraudulent activity which can result from incorrect disclosure or faulty financial information being provided to an investor. 

 

TradeCheck helps issuers and intermediaries comply with the regulations set by the broker-dealer operating their Alternative Trading System (ATS). It provides automated compliance checks and produces reports detailing transactions, providing transparency for investors in the regulatory compliance process. TradeCheck applies to many different types of securities and brings multiple benefits to investors, intermediaries, and other parties involved in the trading process. Ultimately, TradeCheck helps to reduce risk and increase investor confidence in trading securities.

What is Affinity Marketing?

Affinity marketing is an effective way to increase brand recognition and reach a larger target audience, especially when it comes to raising capital. By leveraging existing connections with customers, companies can improve their visibility and attract more investors. With the right strategy and tools, affinity marketing can be a powerful tool for businesses looking to expand their customer base and create trust between parties. 

 

Affinity marketing is a type of marketing strategy that focuses on creating relationships between a company and its customer base. This connection could be due to things like shared values, such as environmental sustainability or ethical labor practices. The main goal of this approach is to create loyalty and increase brand recognition. The idea behind affinity marketing is that a brand can appeal to an audience that is connected by brand loyalty, shared values, or other aspects that would make them like to make a purchase, return as a customer, or even become investors. 

 

Using the JOBS Act and Affinity Marketing

 

With Regulations A+ and CF, affinity marketing is an effective way to raise capital. By leveraging existing connections with customers, companies can reach a larger target audience and increase their chances of success. When beginning new capital-raising efforts, affinity marketing promotes a sense of trust and credibility.

 

Whether you have had several raises in the past or this is your first capital raise, affinity marketing is an effective way to reach a larger target audience. Leveraging your existing connections can help you gain exposure and attract more investors because people trust the brands they already know. By leveraging this group of investors, you can improve the visibility of your company and reach a larger pool by utilizing these people as a type of brand ambassador for your marketing.

 

Tips For Implementing Affinity Marketing Effectively

 

When implementing an affinity marketing strategy, there are certain steps you should take to ensure success. Here are some tips for using this type of marketing effectively:

 

Identify your target audience: Identify a customer base that shares similar values or had displayed brand loyalty. This will help you create a more tailored marketing plan that is specific to the target audience.

 

Set clear objectives and goals: Setting clear, measurable objectives and goals will help ensure that your affinity marketing strategy is successful. It will also allow you to track progress and make necessary adjustments as needed.

 

Communicate with your partner: Establishing a strong relationship with your affinity marketing partner, like an investor acquisition firm, is essential for success. Communicating regularly and discussing expectations, challenges, and successes will help foster collaboration and ensure successful outcomes.

 

Measure results: Tracking metrics such as customer acquisition rate, customer engagement rate, or return on investment (ROI) is important to determine the success of your affinity marketing strategy.

 

Affinity marketing is an effective way to increase brand recognition and reach a larger target audience. Especially when raising capital. By leveraging existing connections with customers, companies can reach more potential investors and create trust between parties. Additionally, tracking specific metrics can help measure success and ensure that you are meeting your goals. With the right strategy and tools, affinity marketing can be an effective way to increase brand visibility and reach a larger pool of investors.

 

How Do I Know if My Cap Table is Ready?

A cap table (short for capitalization table) is essential for any company looking to raise capital. It provides a detailed breakdown of the equity owned by shareholders, enabling founders to understand how their offerings will be impacted and make sound decisions regarding their finances. When properly managed, cap tables help potential investors feel confident in their investments as they provide a clear picture of the company’s ownership. As such, understanding your cap table and ensuring it is up to date is important when assessing if your company is ready to move forward with fundraising efforts.

 

Must-Haves for Proper Cap Table Management

 

When it comes to cap table management, remember to include this elements:

 

  • Voting rights
  • Share issuance
  • Past and current shareholders
  • List any future projections for additional capital raises or dilution
  • Track all options grants, vesting schedules, and related information
  • The amount of money each shareholder has invested in the company
  • Include details about convertible notes, warrants, and other debt instruments
  • Clearly list all shareholders, their ownership percentages, and the date of their investments

 

All of the above must be taken into consideration and recorded accurately to ensure proper cap table management. With these basics accounted for, founders can feel confident that their cap table contains the necessary information so they can be ready to raise capital. Still, some dos and don’ts should also be observed to ensure the best possible outcome for organizations raising capital.

 

Cap Table Dos: 

 

  • Ensure that all information is readily available in an easy-to-understand way
  • Maintain accurate and up-to-date information
  • Take into account dilution from future funding rounds, options pools, and performance issues

 

Cap Table Don’ts 

 

  • Overlooking the potential for dilution when raising capital
  • Failing to update it when new shareholders invest
  • Hesitating to consult a legal or financial advisor with any questions that arise
  • Neglecting the importance of understanding the cap table and its implications

 

By following these dos and don’ts, organizations can avoid potential pitfalls in the capital raising process and ensure an efficient, effective raise for all involved parties. A well-maintained cap table ensures transparency between investors, founders, and shareholders.

 

Best Practices for Managing a Cap Table

 

Though having a comprehensive cap table is vital, keeping it updated and organized requires consistent effort. To ensure your cap table remains accurate, it’s essential to follow the best practices for managing a cap table, including:

 

  • Updating the tables regularly as new investments come in or out
  • Keeping multiple copies of the tables in both digital and physical form
  • Storing the cap table in a secure location with proper backups for redundancy
  • Utilizing a FINRA broker-deal with knowledge of and experience handling cap tables for JOBS Act raises
  • Monitoring new regulations and laws to ensure the cap table is compliant with all applicable standards

 

By following these best practices for managing a cap table, companies can ensure accuracy, transparency, and compliance when looking to benefit from raising capital. It will also give investors confidence that they have all the information they need to make informed decisions.

Who Does Due Diligence on Companies using RegA+?

Due diligence is an essential part of the investment process. Especially following the passage of the JOBS Act in 2012, which expanded Regulation A+ (RegA+), companies now have additional opportunities to seek capital from investors. This has created a need for due diligence on these companies that is both thorough and efficient. In this blog post, we will discuss who does due diligence on companies using RegA+ and who does due diligence on companies using RegA+.

 

What Is Due Diligence?

 

The Securities Act of 1933, a result of the stock market crash years earlier, introduced due diligence as a common practice. The purpose of the act was to create transparency into the financial statements of companies and protect investors from fraud. While the SEC requires the information provided to be accurate, it does not make any guarantees of its accuracy. However, the Securities Act of 1933 for the first time allowed investors to make informed decisions regarding their investments.  

 

In the context of raising capital through RegA+, due diligence means that the issuer has provided all of the necessary information to investors and securities regulators so that they comply with securities laws. This may include information like:

 

  • Funding: The issuer should provide a detailed plan of how the money raised through RegA+ will be used.
  • Products/Services: The issuer should provide a clear description of their products and services, as well as any potential advantages that they may have over the competition.
  • Business Plan: The issuer should provide a detailed and comprehensive business plan outlining their current and future projects, as well as realistic projections based on their financial reports.
  • Management Team: The issuer should disclose information about the company’s officers, founders, board members, and any previous experience in business that may be relevant to investors.

 

Issuers should also use a registered broker-dealer as an intermediary to comply with Regulation A+ (RegA+). By doing this, they will ensure that they are meeting their due diligence requirements.

 

Who Is Responsible for Doing Due Diligence on companies using RegA+?

 

When it comes to due diligence for companies using RegA+, typically, the issuer’s FINRA Broker-Dealer is responsible for conducting due diligence both on the potential investors and the company itself. The broker-dealer will be required to perform regulatory checks on investors such as KYC, AML, and investor suitability to ensure investors are appropriate for the company. Additionally, they will perform due diligence on the issuer so that they can be assured that the company is operating in a manner compliant with securities laws so that they do not present false information to investors. Failing to meet compliance standards can result in the issuer being left responsible for severe penalties, such as returning all money raised to investors. 

 

However, both investors and issuers have a responsibility for due diligence as well. Investors should research the company thoroughly and make sure they understand all details surrounding the offering before investing their money. This includes reviewing all relevant documents, such as the offering circular, stock subscription agreements, and other related materials that give them a good understanding of the investment opportunity and its potential risks.

 

Issuers also contribute to due diligence as they must work with their FINRA Broker-Dealer to ensure that their offering is compliant with all laws and regulations. This includes verifying all information provided in the offering materials and making sure it meets regulatory requirements. The issuer must also disclose all information that could influence an investor’s decision to purchase the securities. 

 

Due diligence is essential for both investors and issuers when it comes to investments under Regulation A+ (RegA+). Ensure that thorough due diligence is conducted ensures that the offering is conducted in a manner that aligns with the best interests of both investors and the issuer. Ultimately, due diligence is a key component when it comes to investments under Regulation A+ (RegA+) and should not be overlooked.

 

Why Use RegCF for Real Estate?

Companies in the real estate industry have a variety of financing options available for their projects, but one that is often overlooked is the use of Regulation Crowdfunding (Reg CF). Equity crowdfunding is becoming an increasingly popular tool among companies due to its potential to provide access to potentially high-yielding investments and the ability to offer new ways for investors to diversify their portfolios. 

 

What is Reg CF for Real Estate?

 

Reg CF is a type of equity crowdfunding that allows companies to raise capital from everyday individuals, not just accredited investors. Unlike traditional real estate investments, the price tag for Reg CF investments is much smaller, making it more appealing to a wide range of investors. Companies can sell securities such as stocks or debt instruments in exchange for investor funds. For real estate, this can be done in various ways such as selling shares in a real estate investment trust (REIT), selling property-specific investments, or launching a syndication.

 

Benefits of Reg CF for Real Estate

 

Using regulation CF for real estate offers a wide range of benefits to both investors and issuers that may not be readily available with other forms of capital raising. These benefits include:

 

It Can Provide Access to High-Yielding Investment Opportunities: Real estate investments can offer higher returns than traditional stocks and bonds, with an average annual return of 12.9% according to a study by the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance in 2017. By using Reg CF, investors can tap into this high-potential market and issuers can access the capital to fund their real estate projects.

 

It Offers a More Diverse Investment Portfolio: Real estate equity crowdfunding allows investors to invest in specific projects or properties, rather than having to invest in an entire REIT or development company. This provides more control and transparency for the investor as they can see exactly where their money is going.

 

It Can Offer Lower Investment Requirements: When using Reg CF, the minimum investment is typically much lower than traditional real estate investments, meaning that anyone can invest as little or as much as they want in a given project. This makes it easier for companies to attract a larger pool of potential investors and increase their chances of successfully raising the necessary funds.

 

It Can Help Facilitate Market Research: When using Reg CF, issuers must provide investors with all the information they need to make an informed decision, in-depth market research included. This can increase investor confidence in the project and potentially lead to higher returns for real estate agents.

 

Reg CF is an effective tool in the real estate space, allowing companies to access capital quickly and easily from a wide range of potential investors. As the popularity of crowdfunding continues to grow, it is becoming increasingly important for companies in the real estate space to understand how Reg CF works and how it can be used in conjunction with other financing methods to maximize their fundraising efforts.